History of Kavango-Zambezi (KAZA) Transfrontier Conservation Area

The idea for a transboundary conservation area in the Kavango and Zambezi river basins was first proposed in the late 1990s by conservation organizations and government agencies in the region. The concept was to create a large, contiguous area that would enable wildlife to move freely across international borders, and to promote regional cooperation on conservation and development issues.

In 2003, a Memorandum of Understanding was signed by the governments of Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia, and Zimbabwe to establish the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA). The signing of the MOU was followed by a series of meetings and consultations over the next several years, during which the parties developed a framework for the management and implementation of the conservation area.

In 2010, the KAZA TFCA was officially launched, and in 2011, a treaty was signed by the five governments to establish the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA). The treaty established a formal legal framework for the management of the conservation area and provided for the establishment of a transboundary committee to oversee its implementation.

Since then, the KAZA region has been the focus of a range of conservation and development initiatives, including efforts to promote sustainable tourism, improve wildlife management and anti-poaching measures, and enhance community participation in conservation and natural resource management.

Peace Parkfoundation

The Peace Parks Foundation is very important for Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA). The Foundation is a non-profit organization that works to establish and manage cross-border conservation areas, also known as peace parks, in southern Africa. KAZA TFCA is one of the largest peace parks in the world, and the Peace Parks Foundation has played a significant role in its establishment and ongoing management.

The Peace Parks Foundation has been instrumental in facilitating the cooperation and collaboration between the five countries that make up KAZA TFCA. By bringing together governments, conservation organizations, and local communities, the Peace Parks Foundation has helped to create a shared vision for the conservation and sustainable use of the natural resources in the region.

The Foundation has also provided financial and technical support for various conservation initiatives in KAZA TFCA, including the development of community-owned conservation areas, anti-poaching efforts, and the promotion of ecotourism.

Furthermore, the Peace Parks Foundation has helped to establish transboundary conservation corridors, which are essential for maintaining healthy populations and genetic diversity of wildlife in the region. These corridors allow animals to move freely between different parts of KAZA TFCA, even across international borders, without encountering obstacles such as fences or roads.

Overall, the Peace Parks Foundation has played a crucial role in the establishment and ongoing management of KAZA TFCA, and its continued support is essential for the success of conservation efforts in the region.

 


 

Impact of KAZA TFCA

The Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA) has the potential to have a significant impact on biodiversity conservation, local communities, and regional development. 

Objectives

Biodiversity conservation

The primary objective of KAZA TFCA is to conserve the biodiversity of the region, including its wildlife, plants, and ecosystems. This is achieved through the establishment of protected areas, community-based conservation initiatives, and other conservation strategies.

Ecological connectivity

KAZA TFCA aims to promote ecological connectivity between protected areas and other key habitats, in order to maintain healthy ecosystems and facilitate the movement of wildlife.

Sustainable tourism

KAZA TFCA seeks to promote sustainable tourism that benefits both local communities and the conservation of the region's biodiversity. This involves working with local communities to develop tourism products that are culturally and ecologically sensitive, as well as promoting responsible tourism practices.

Economic development

KAZA TFCA aims to promote economic development in the region, particularly through the development of sustainable livelihoods for local communities. This includes initiatives such as community-based natural resource management and sustainable agriculture.

Regional cooperation

KAZA TFCA is a transboundary conservation initiative that aims to promote regional cooperation and integration between the countries of Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. This involves working together to address common environmental challenges and to promote the conservation of the region's biodiversity.

 

Overall, the objectives of KAZA TFCA are focused on promoting the conservation of the region's biodiversity, while also supporting sustainable development and regional integration. By working together, the countries of the region can help to protect this important area for future generations

Benefits

The Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA) has the potential to provide a range of benefits, both for the conservation of biodiversity and ecosystems and for the communities living within and around the conservation area. Some of the key benefits of the KAZA TFCA include:

Conservation of biodiversity

The KAZA TFCA is home to a significant proportion of Africa's biodiversity, including a number of endangered species such as African elephants, lions, and African wild dogs. By promoting conservation and sustainable management of these species and their habitats, the KAZA TFCA can contribute to the preservation of Africa's natural heritage.

Ecotourism

The KAZA TFCA has the potential to become a major ecotourism destination, offering visitors the opportunity to experience Africa's natural beauty and wildlife in a sustainable and responsible manner. Ecotourism can provide economic benefits to local communities and support conservation efforts within the area.

Community benefits

The KAZA TFCA involves local communities in conservation and sustainable development initiatives, providing opportunities for community-based natural resource management, sustainable agriculture, and other livelihood activities. This can contribute to poverty reduction and support local economies.

Improved governance and cooperation

The KAZA TFCA involves multiple countries and stakeholders, providing opportunities for improved governance and cooperation on conservation and sustainable development issues. By working together, countries can address common challenges and promote sustainable development in the region.

Climate change mitigation

The KAZA TFCA's conservation efforts can contribute to climate change mitigation by promoting sustainable land use practices, protecting forests and other carbon sinks, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and land use change.

 

Overall, the KAZA TFCA has the potential to provide significant benefits for biodiversity conservation, ecotourism, community development, governance, and climate change mitigation. However, realizing these benefits will require sustained effort and investment, as well as effective governance structures and mechanisms to ensure that conservation efforts are coordinated and effective.

Current issues 

The Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA) is facing several current issues and challenges, including:

Poaching

The KAZA TFCA is home to a significant population of African elephants and other endangered species, and poaching remains a serious threat to these animals. Despite efforts by national governments and conservation organizations, poaching continues to occur within the conservation area.

Human-wildlife conflict

As human populations grow and encroach on wildlife habitats, conflict between humans and animals is becoming increasingly common within the KAZA TFCA. This includes conflict between farmers and wildlife, as well as incidents of wildlife attacking and killing humans.

Habitat loss and degradation

Habitat loss and degradation are major threats to biodiversity within the KAZA TFCA. This includes deforestation, soil erosion, and degradation of wetlands and other important habitats.

Climate change

The KAZA TFCA is already experiencing the impacts of climate change, including changes in rainfall patterns, increased temperatures, and more frequent extreme weather events. These changes are affecting biodiversity and ecosystem health within the conservation area.

Lack of resources

The KAZA TFCA is a large and complex conservation area that requires significant resources to manage effectively. However, resources are often limited, and there is a need for increased investment in conservation efforts.

Coordination and governance

The KAZA TFCA involves multiple countries and stakeholders, which can make coordination and governance challenging. There is a need for effective governance structures and mechanisms to ensure that conservation efforts are coordinated and effective.

 

Overall, the KAZA TFCA faces significant challenges and requires sustained effort and investment to address these issues and ensure the long-term conservation of biodiversity and ecosystems within the area.

Success of KZAZ TFCA

Assessing the success of Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA) is a complex and ongoing process, but there have been several positive developments since the initiative was established. Some examples of success include:

Increased protected area coverage

KAZA TFCA has facilitated the creation of new protected areas and the expansion of existing ones, which has helped to conserve key habitats and species. For example, the expansion of protected areas in Namibia has led to an increase in the population of black rhinoceroses.

Improved regional cooperation

KAZA TFCA has helped to foster cooperation and collaboration between the countries of Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. This has facilitated the exchange of information, resources, and expertise, and has helped to address common environmental challenges.

Sustainable tourism development

KAZA TFCA has supported the development of sustainable tourism initiatives that provide economic benefits to local communities while also promoting the conservation of natural resources. For example, community-based tourism initiatives in Zambia and Zimbabwe have provided income for local communities while also promoting the conservation of wildlife.

Increased awareness and education

KAZA TFCA has helped to raise awareness about the importance of biodiversity conservation and sustainable development in the region. This has been achieved through various educational and awareness-raising initiatives, such as public outreach campaigns and the development of educational materials.

Improved livelihoods

KAZA TFCA has supported the development of sustainable livelihoods for local communities, particularly through initiatives such as community-based natural resource management and sustainable agriculture. These initiatives have helped to reduce dependence on unsustainable practices such as poaching and overgrazing.

 

While there have been positive developments, there are also challenges and areas where further progress is needed. These include issues such as the illegal wildlife trade, human-wildlife conflict, and the impact of climate change. Nevertheless, KAZA TFCA has made important strides in conserving biodiversity and promoting sustainable development in the region, and has the potential to achieve even greater success in the future.

However, the impact of the KAZA TFCA will depend on the effectiveness of governance structures and mechanisms, the level of investment and resources allocated to conservation and sustainable development initiatives, and the degree of involvement and participation of local communities and stakeholders. There are also potential risks and challenges associated with the development of large-scale conservation areas, such as human-wildlife conflict, displacement of local communities, and unsustainable use of natural resources. These risks will need to be carefully managed to ensure that the KAZA TFCA's impacts are positive and sustainable over the long term.

Verantwortlich: Michael Dieckmann - Keywords.de GmbH - Adams-Lehmann-Str. 56 - 80797 München Email: info@kaza.org

Registereintrag: Handelsregister: HRB 170181 AG München Umsatzsteuer-ID:DE 257105537