Communities at KAZA TFCA 

The Kavango-Zambezi (KAZA) Transfrontier Conservation Area is home to several indigenous communities, including the San, Ovaherero, Himba, and Lozi people. These communities have lived in the region for many generations and have a deep understanding of the local ecosystems and natural resources.The Kavango-Zambezi (KAZA) Transfrontier Conservation Area is home to several indigenous communities, including the San, Ovaherero, Himba, and Lozi people. These communities have lived in the region for many generations and have a deep understanding of the local ecosystems and natural resources.

The conservation and development of the KAZA region is closely linked to the well-being of these communities, and many efforts have been made to involve them in conservation and sustainable development initiatives. Community-based natural resource management programs have been established to give local people a greater voice in the management of their natural resources, and ecotourism initiatives have been developed to provide income-generating opportunities for communities living in and around the conservation area.

In addition, there are several community-owned conservation areas within KAZA, which are managed by local people and provide a sanctuary for wildlife while generating income for the communities that manage them. These include the Bwabwata, Mudumu, and Mamili national parks in Namibia, and the Sioma Ngwezi and Kazangula wildlife management areas in Zambia.

Efforts are also underway to promote sustainable agriculture and other forms of livelihoods that are compatible with conservation goals. This includes the promotion of sustainable fishing practices, the development of community-based forestry initiatives, and the establishment of small-scale enterprises that produce handicrafts and other products using local materials. By involving local communities in conservation and sustainable development efforts, it is hoped that the KAZA region can become a model for sustainable development in Africa.

Community-owned conservation areas within KAZA

There are several community-owned conservation areas within the Kavango-Zambezi (KAZA) Transfrontier Conservation Area, which are managed by local communities and provide a sanctuary for wildlife while generating income for the communities that manage them. 

These community-owned conservation areas are an important part of the KAZA region's conservation and sustainable development efforts, as they help to ensure that local communities have a stake in the management and conservation of their natural resources

Importance of community-owend conservation areas at KAZA

Community-owned conservation areas are extremely important at Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA). 

Community-owned conservation areas are vital because they involve local communities in the conservation process. These communities are often the ones who live closest to the wildlife and the natural resources, and they rely on these resources for their livelihoods. By involving them in the management of the conservation area, they become stakeholders and are more likely to become invested in protecting it.

Furthermore, community-owned conservation areas often prioritize sustainable and responsible use of natural resources over short-term exploitation. This ensures that the resources will be available for future generations, and that the local communities will continue to benefit from them.

In KAZA TFCA, community-owned conservation areas also help to create corridors for wildlife movement, which is essential for maintaining healthy populations and genetic diversity. These corridors allow animals to move between different parts of the conservation area, and even between different countries, without encountering barriers such as fences or roads.

Overall, community-owned conservation areas are a critical component of conservation efforts in KAZA TFCA, as they help to protect wildlife, promote sustainable use of natural resources, and involve local communities in the conservation process.

 

Bwabwata National Park

 

This park is located in northeastern Namibia and is managed by a partnership between the Namibian government and the local communities living in and around the park. The park covers an area of 6,100 square kilometers and is home to a wide variety of wildlife, including elephants, lions, and wild dogs. The community-managed tourism program in the park provides employment opportunities and generates income for local communities.

Mudumu National Park

 

This park is located in the Caprivi Strip region of Namibia and is managed by the local communities living in and around the park. The park covers an area of 1,000 square kilometers and is home to a variety of wildlife, including elephants, buffalos, and antelopes. The park's community-based conservation program provides employment opportunities and generates income for local communities.

Kazangula Wildlife Management Area

This area is located in Zambia and is managed by the Kazangula Community Resource Board, a community-based organization made up of representatives from the local communities living in and around the area. The management area covers an area of 1,970 square kilometers and is home to a variety of wildlife, including elephants, lions, and leopards. The area's community-based tourism program provides employment opportunities and generates income for local communities.

Sioma Ngwezi National Park

 

Sioma Ngwezi National Park: This park is located in western Zambia and is managed by the local communities living in and around the park. The park covers an area of 5,000 square kilometers and is home to a variety of wildlife, including elephants, buffalos, and lions. The park's community-based conservation program provides employment opportunities and generates income for local communities.

Verantwortlich: Michael Dieckmann - Keywords.de GmbH - Adams-Lehmann-Str. 56 - 80797 München Email: info@kaza.org

Registereintrag: Handelsregister: HRB 170181 AG München Umsatzsteuer-ID:DE 257105537