KAZA Transfronier Conservation Area 

Kavango-Zambezi (KAZA) is a transboundary conservation area in Southern Africa, which covers approximately 520,000 square kilometers across five countries: Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The area includes several national parks, game reserves, and wildlife management areas, and is home to a diverse range of wildlife, including elephants, lions, leopards, hippos, crocodiles, and many other species. KAZA was established in 2011 with the goal of promoting sustainable development and biodiversity conservation in the region.

Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area

  • KAZA is the largest transboundary conservation area in Africa, and one of the largest in the world.
  • The area is named after two major rivers that flow through it: the Kavango River in the north and the Zambezi River in the south.
  • KAZA is home to several iconic natural landmarks and attractions, including Victoria Falls (one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World), Okavango Delta (a vast wetland system that supports a wide variety of wildlife), and the Caprivi Strip (a narrow strip of land in Namibia that extends eastward and provides a vital corridor for wildlife migration).
  • The KAZA region is home to over 600 species of birds, as well as many mammals, reptiles, and amphibians.
  • The area is also culturally rich, with several indigenous communities living within its borders, including the San, Ovaherero, Himba, and Lozi people.
  • KAZA's objectives include promoting tourism, strengthening conservation efforts, and promoting sustainable development in the region. The conservation area is managed by a transboundary committee made up of representatives from each of the five countries involved.
Elephant at KAZA TFCA

National Parks at KAZA

The Kavango-Zambezi (KAZA) Transfrontier Conservation Area is home to several national parks, which are managed by the respective countries within the KAZA region. Here are some examples of national parks in the KAZA region:

  1. Chobe National Park: This park is located in northern Botswana and is known for its large population of elephants. The park covers an area of 11,700 square kilometers and is home to a variety of other wildlife, including lions, leopards, and hyenas.
  2. Hwange National Park: This park is located in western Zimbabwe and is the country's largest national park. The park covers an area of 14,651 square kilometers and is home to a variety of wildlife, including elephants, lions, and giraffes.
  3. Kafue National Park: This park is located in central Zambia and is the country's largest national park. The park covers an area of 22,480 square kilometers and is home to a variety of wildlife, including elephants, hippos, and crocodiles.
  4. Mana Pools National Park: This park is located in northern Zimbabwe and is known for its scenic beauty and wildlife viewing opportunities. The park covers an area of 2,196 square kilometers and is home to a variety of wildlife, including elephants, lions, and zebras.
  5. Mosi-oa-Tunya National Park: This park is located in southern Zambia and is home to the Victoria Falls, one of the world's largest waterfalls. The park covers an area of 66 square kilometers and is home to a variety of wildlife, including elephants, buffalos, and zebras.

These national parks are important for the conservation of biodiversity in the KAZA region and provide important opportunities for tourism and recreation. They also help to generate income for the countries and communities within the KAZA region, which can be used to support conservation and sustainable development initiatives.

Wildlife at Kaza Transfrontier Conservation Area

Elephants at Kaza 

The Kaza Transfrontier Conservation Area (TFCA) is home to one of the largest populations of African elephants in the world. It is estimated that there are over 200,000 elephants living within the Kaza TFCA, which spans five southern African countries: Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

The elephant population in the Kaza TFCA is particularly notable because it is one of the last remaining areas in Africa where elephants can move freely across national borders. The conservation area provides a vast and connected habitat for the elephants to roam, allowing for healthy genetic diversity and natural migration patterns.

In addition to their impressive numbers, the elephants in the Kaza TFCA are also known for their large size and unique behavior. Because the region is relatively undisturbed by human activity, the elephants are able to live and behave in their natural state. This means that visitors to the area have the opportunity to observe elephants engaging in a wide range of natural behaviors, such as feeding, socializing, and bathing in the many rivers and waterways in the region.

Overall, the elephants in the Kaza TFCA are a key part of the area's rich biodiversity and are a major draw for tourists looking to experience the beauty of Africa's wildlife up close.

Insects at Kaza

The Kaza is home to a remarkable diversity of birdlife, with over 600 species of birds recorded in the region. The area's rich array of habitats, including rivers, wetlands, grasslands, and woodlands, provide ideal conditions for a wide range of bird species.

Some of the most notable bird species: 

African fish eagle - a majestic bird of prey that is often seen soaring over rivers and waterways in search of fish.

Carmine bee-eater - a brightly colored bird that feeds on bees and other insects and is often seen in large flocks nesting in riverbanks.

Saddle-billed stork - a striking bird with black and white plumage and a brightly colored bill that feeds on fish and other aquatic prey.

Pel's fishing owl - a large and elusive bird of prey that feeds on fish and is often seen hunting at night along riverbanks.

Southern ground hornbill - a large and distinctive bird with black and white plumage and a red throat pouch, which feeds on insects, small mammals, and reptiles.

Kori bustard - a large terrestrial bird that is known for its elaborate courtship displays and can often be seen strutting across the grasslands.

Wattled crane - a critically endangered bird that is one of the tallest and most striking of all cranes, with a distinctive red crown and long, dangling wattles.

 

Birds at Kaza

The Area is home to a diverse range of insects, many of which play important roles in the region's ecosystems. Some of the most notable insect species:

Termites - Termites are an important part of the Kaza TFCA's ecosystem, playing a vital role in breaking down dead plant material and enriching the soil. They also serve as a key food source for many other animals in the region.

Butterflies - The Kaza TFCA is home to a wide variety of butterfly species, including the African monarch, the painted lady, and the swallowtail butterfly. Butterflies play important roles as pollinators and are a major source of food for many bird species.

Bees - Bees are important pollinators in the Kaza TFCA, helping to fertilize the many flowering plants and trees found in the region. They also produce honey, which is an important source of food for many people living in the area.

Ants - Ants are abundant in the Kaza TFCA and play important roles in maintaining the region's ecosystems. They help to control other insect populations, break down dead plant material, and aerate the soil.

Beetles - The Kaza TFCA is home to a wide variety of beetle species, including dung beetles, which help to break down animal waste and enrich the soil.

Overall, the insects of the Kaza TFCA are an important part of the region's biodiversity, playing key roles in maintaining healthy ecosystems and serving as vital sources of food for many other species in the area.

Sustainable tourismus at Kavango-Zambezi TFCA

How improtant is sustainable tourismus?

Sustainable tourism is an important component of Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA), as it provides economic benefits to local communities while also promoting the conservation of natural resources. Some examples of sustainable tourism initiatives at KAZA TFCA include:

  1. Community-based tourism: KAZA TFCA has supported the development of community-based tourism initiatives that provide economic benefits to local communities. For example, in Zambia and Zimbabwe, community-based tourism initiatives have provided income for local communities through activities such as cultural tours, wildlife viewing, and handicraft sales.
  2. Eco-tourism: KAZA TFCA has supported the development of eco-tourism initiatives that promote responsible travel practices and the conservation of natural resources. For example, in Botswana, eco-tourism operators provide guided tours that educate visitors about the importance of conservation and sustainable development.
  3. Wildlife conservation: Tourism at KAZA TFCA has also contributed to wildlife conservation efforts. For example, revenue from tourism activities has been used to support anti-poaching efforts and other wildlife conservation initiatives.
  4. Sustainable accommodation: KAZA TFCA promotes the development of sustainable accommodation options that minimize the impact on natural resources and provide economic benefits to local communities. For example, in Namibia, several lodges have been constructed using eco-friendly materials and sustainable building practices.
  5. Responsible travel practices: KAZA TFCA encourages visitors to practice responsible travel practices, such as reducing their carbon footprint and minimizing waste. For example, visitors are encouraged to use reusable water bottles and to minimize the use of plastic.

Overall, sustainable tourism is an important component of KAZA TFCA, as it provides economic benefits to local communities while also promoting the conservation of natural resources. By supporting sustainable tourism initiatives, KAZA TFCA can help to ensure that the benefits of tourism are shared in a way that promotes the long-term sustainability of the region's natural resources and communities.

 

We love KAZA

The Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA) is an incredible ecosystem that supports a high diversity of wildlife and vegetation. It is an important conservation area that spans across five countries, and it offers visitors an opportunity to experience the natural beauty and cultural heritage of the region. Whether you are interested in wildlife viewing, cultural experiences, or simply enjoying the stunning landscapes, KAZA TFCA has something to offer for everyone. Lorem ipsum dolor sit dui amet sed urna eget porta est in adipiscing.

Verantwortlich: Michael Dieckmann - Keywords.de GmbH - Adams-Lehmann-Str. 56 - 80797 München Email: info@kaza.org

Registereintrag: Handelsregister: HRB 170181 AG München Umsatzsteuer-ID:DE 257105537